Work Safety Starts With Having the Right Cable Tools

Prevent injuries with safer cable tools

Most people know that providing electricity and telecommunication services to homes and businesses is vital for economic, social, and cultural development. However, people often overlook the many resources needed to maintain them. Teams of line workers, technicians, and installers work tirelessly in any weather, sometimes severe environments, and as a result, face unique health risks. Single, life-altering incidents such as falls, electric shock, and burns are often associated with this line of work. Unfortunately, there are more common injuries that may not draw as much attention but can be just as costly.

According to the CDC, hands and fingers are the body parts most frequently injured at work and represent the most common reason for non-fatal emergency room visits.

Many typical injuries, like cuts and repetitive motion injuries, are easily avoidable. In addition to increasing the reliability and speed of cable preparation, user safety has been the top priority throughout the 80 years that Ripley has developed and manufactured tools.

According to the CDC, hands and fingers are the body parts most frequently injured at work and represent the most common reason for non-fatal emergency room visits.1 Hands are one of our most valuable assets. For a moment, imagine the impact that not being able to use them would have on your life.

Lacerations caused by knives are a significant source of hand injuries, and many employers are making a move to eliminate knives from the job site. Having the right PPA on the job is a great start, but it can be tough to enforce with field positions. Ultimately, the one sure way to avoid a cut from a knife is not to use one at all.

The Cost of Hand Injuries

Besides the concern for the health and well being of employees, employers are also looking to reduce both the direct and indirect costs of job-related injuries. According to the National Safety Council, the average worker's compensation cost for a hand injury is over $13,000 in medical expenses.2

When factoring in the indirect costs of lost productivity, overtime expenses for missed work, and the cost of hiring or training a new employee, the price can rise 4 to 20 times the initial injury cost.

What's the Cost?

Hand Injury Cost (Direct Cost) $13,000
Indirect Costs 4x-20x Direct Cost
Total Potential Cost Per Injury $50,000 - $260,000

Reduce Cuts From Knives

It's easy! To decrease cuts to hands, eliminate or reduce the need for knives. Another preventative action is to mitigate any tasks that can cause repetitive motion injuries. Ripley's Miller®, Cablematic®, and UtilityTool® brand cable stripping tools eliminate the need for traditional utility knives during cable preparation. With shielded blades and ergonomic handles, Ripley designs tools with user safety in mind.

Ultimately, the one sure way to avoid a cut from a knife is not to use one at all.

Cable preparation that once had to be done by hand with a knife can now be completed faster, more accurately and with less risk of injury. Some workers are "masters with a lineman's knife" and won't see the need to replace it. It is challenging to change habitual behavior; however, Ripley's technical experts can show your team a safer, faster, and more efficient way.

An employer's most important task is to ensure that employees return to their loved ones in the same condition as when they arrived at work. Ripley can help.

Additional Information

To view the full line of UtilityTool® brand products for power utility applications, including the new Infinity US01 Adjustable Mid-Span and End Stripper, click here.

To view the full line of Miller® brand tools for fiber optic cable applications, including the new MSAT® 16 Mid-Span Access Stripper, click here.

To view the full line of Cablematic® brand tools for coaxial cable applications, including the industry-trusted coring and stripping tools, click here.

To find your nearest distributor, click here.


Sources:
1https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000323.htm
2https://injuryfacts.nsc.org/work/costs/workers-compensation-costs

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